The main psychological cause of insomnia

Sleep is a natural behavior; people are wired to slumber at night. However, many don’t, and consequently face illness and less ease. There are several causes, from the effects of medication, to practical issues, like disturbances and discomfort or pain. But let’s look at the mental, or emotional reasons for sleepless nights.

People may not sleep because their minds are full of thoughts. The cause of an overactive mind is stress, which can result in palpitations and tension headaches.

Sometimes, you know why your mind races; you have an ongoing problem. You might be fearful, have low-self-esteem, or difficult relationships. At other times, you may not recognize you are anxious because you’re used to living in a stressed state.

Stress can be obvious, or creep into your mind and bones causing tension and worry. When you worry at night, you emphasize difficulties and they grow. The challenges you face can feel as big as Kilimanjaro. Like most live volcanoes, it’s only a matter of time before an eruption is due. This is when your stress turns into a physical complaint or illness. Until then, and for a while after, it keeps you awake.

First, recognize you put the equivalent of Kilimanjaro in your head, it doesn’t belong there, but what you put in can also be taken out. Knowing you are in charge gives you the power to make changes. If the reason for stress is clear, get out of bed and write it in a notebook. Structure a sentence stating you will deal with it the following day.

Next, get physically comfortable; make doing so the only topic in your head. Fetch extra pillows and blankets if you want, or open the window for air. Snuggle into your bed, wiggling until you notice the sensation of comfort. Focus on that feeling wherever it’s recognizable in your body, and allow it to spread, bit-by-bit, until your whole body is comfortable.

When your body is relaxed, pay attention to breathing slowly and deeply. Notice your breath as it enters your nose and travels to your lungs. Feel them fill with air, hold your breath for a few seconds comfortably, and then follow your breath as you breathe out.

Keep following your breath, perhaps adding a mantra like the word peace to every exhalation. Eventually, your stress will decrease. Next, manage your emotions in the day, dealing with solvable problems. Additionally, reduce stress before it builds. Regularly breathe deeply, using your mantra if you want, and organize at least one special activity to do later.

You might arrange to walk in the countryside among nature, watch the sun go down with a cup of your favorite brew, or take a bubble bath. The idea is to self-nourish because if you are stressed, you’ve been doing the opposite. Regular negative thoughts and tension has built into the problems you experience at night when there are no distractions. Start to make calmness part of your life. The subject you entertain most, which you focus on more than others, influences your well-being above all else. Make it positive and you will sleep well.

About bridget

bridget webber

Bridget Webber’s background rests in mental health, counselling, hypnotherapy, NLP and art. She brings knowledge from her experiences into her writing and specializes in emotional wellness and the creation of, rather than search for, joy. You can catch up with her insights and musings on Twitter.

Twitter: @InsightManager

2 Reactions

  1. cat lover

    Dear friend have a amazing day and stress free

    • bridget

      Many thanks, Cat Lover, you have a beautiful day as well!

The main psychological cause of insomnia

Sleep is a natural behavior; people are wired to slumber at night. However, many don’t, and consequently face illness and less ease. There are several causes, from the effects of medication, to practical issues, like disturbances and discomfort or pain. But let’s look at the mental, or emotional reasons for sleepless nights.

People may not sleep because their minds are full of thoughts. The cause of an overactive mind is stress, which can result in palpitations and tension headaches.

Sometimes, you know why your mind races; you have an ongoing problem. You might be fearful, have low-self-esteem, or difficult relationships. At other times, you may not recognize you are anxious because you’re used to living in a stressed state.

Stress can be obvious, or creep into your mind and bones causing tension and worry. When you worry at night, you emphasize difficulties and they grow. The challenges you face can feel as big as Kilimanjaro. Like most live volcanoes, it’s only a matter of time before an eruption is due. This is when your stress turns into a physical complaint or illness. Until then, and for a while after, it keeps you awake.

First, recognize you put the equivalent of Kilimanjaro in your head, it doesn’t belong there, but what you put in can also be taken out. Knowing you are in charge gives you the power to make changes. If the reason for stress is clear, get out of bed and write it in a notebook. Structure a sentence stating you will deal with it the following day.

Next, get physically comfortable; make doing so the only topic in your head. Fetch extra pillows and blankets if you want, or open the window for air. Snuggle into your bed, wiggling until you notice the sensation of comfort. Focus on that feeling wherever it’s recognizable in your body, and allow it to spread, bit-by-bit, until your whole body is comfortable.

When your body is relaxed, pay attention to breathing slowly and deeply. Notice your breath as it enters your nose and travels to your lungs. Feel them fill with air, hold your breath for a few seconds comfortably, and then follow your breath as you breathe out.

Keep following your breath, perhaps adding a mantra like the word peace to every exhalation. Eventually, your stress will decrease. Next, manage your emotions in the day, dealing with solvable problems. Additionally, reduce stress before it builds. Regularly breathe deeply, using your mantra if you want, and organize at least one special activity to do later.

You might arrange to walk in the countryside among nature, watch the sun go down with a cup of your favorite brew, or take a bubble bath. The idea is to self-nourish because if you are stressed, you’ve been doing the opposite. Regular negative thoughts and tension has built into the problems you experience at night when there are no distractions. Start to make calmness part of your life. The subject you entertain most, which you focus on more than others, influences your well-being above all else. Make it positive and you will sleep well.

About bridget

bridget webber

Bridget Webber’s background rests in mental health, counselling, hypnotherapy, NLP and art. She brings knowledge from her experiences into her writing and specializes in emotional wellness and the creation of, rather than search for, joy. You can catch up with her insights and musings on Twitter.

Twitter: @InsightManager

Leave a Reply