Are you a pot that’s boiling over?

Fill your head with negative thoughts and you become like a pot that’s boiling over. There’s no more room for content, and you affect your surroundings, splashing everywhere. The uncomfortable heat rises until you come off the boil.

Discontent is a serious dis-ease. You aren’t happy when filled with critical inner chatter, nor can you think clearly or hear your wise self who provides useful advice. To change, you have to recognize it was you who put yourself on to boil.

You may think someone, or an unwanted situation, provided negative fodder to work with, but your content, your thoughts, stem from your perspective. Your outlook colors everything. No one can see things as they are, as everything is a matter of viewpoint. Difficult circumstances might be a problem or an inspiring challenge providing growth, it depends on how you look at the situation.

Like the contents of a boiling pot, your reactions might be over-the-top. People overreact when stressed because they have limited vision. Their behavior results from fight or flight, and they are physically and mentally tense. To release stress, they need to simmer down.

You can turn off the heat and pressure with stress reduction. Gradually come off the boil with nourishing acts of self-kindness. If your thoughts overwhelm, making problems seem insurmountable, take care of your physical needs and your anxiety will decrease.

Stressed people don’t look after their basic needs, and rarely perform kind actions on their own behalf. If you stop carrying out the behaviors of an anxious person, you will no longer be one. A lack of healthy food, coupled with unhealthy behaviors, results in depletion of the body and soul. Change this, and you will change.

The next step is to look after your mind. If it’s like an overfilled pot on the boil, you have too many thoughts. You can think less by practicing meditation. However, if sitting and focusing on your breath as you let unwanted thoughts go feels impossible, be mindfully aware of your physical actions.

Focus on walking for five minutes – you can increase the time as the days pass – noticing your muscles working as you take a step forward, and how the soles of your feet feel as they touch the ground. When thoughts pop into your head, notice them, but move them back to physical actions. Mindful activity will empty some of the mental clutter in your head and release tension.

There may be more involved in coming off the boil completely, but take care of your body and mind, and you will see how to get out of a stuck way of thinking. Additionally, you will have vitality to see you through difficulties.

About bridget

bridget webber

Bridget Webber’s background rests in mental health, counselling, hypnotherapy, NLP and art. She brings knowledge from her experiences into her writing and specializes in emotional wellness and the creation of, rather than search for, joy. You can catch up with her insights and musings on Twitter.

Twitter: @InsightManager

2 Reactions

  1. Momi

    Thank you. I needed to see my thoughts in print. Now, its aligning myself with change that I find difficult. I will continue to look forward to your articles. As it strengthens my efforts to heal my body and soul.

    • bridget

      Many thanks. I do believe, sometimes, the right information appears at the right time to help us consolidate what we know deep down in our awareness.

Are you a pot that’s boiling over?

Fill your head with negative thoughts and you become like a pot that’s boiling over. There’s no more room for content, and you affect your surroundings, splashing everywhere. The uncomfortable heat rises until you come off the boil.

Discontent is a serious dis-ease. You aren’t happy when filled with critical inner chatter, nor can you think clearly or hear your wise self who provides useful advice. To change, you have to recognize it was you who put yourself on to boil.

You may think someone, or an unwanted situation, provided negative fodder to work with, but your content, your thoughts, stem from your perspective. Your outlook colors everything. No one can see things as they are, as everything is a matter of viewpoint. Difficult circumstances might be a problem or an inspiring challenge providing growth, it depends on how you look at the situation.

Like the contents of a boiling pot, your reactions might be over-the-top. People overreact when stressed because they have limited vision. Their behavior results from fight or flight, and they are physically and mentally tense. To release stress, they need to simmer down.

You can turn off the heat and pressure with stress reduction. Gradually come off the boil with nourishing acts of self-kindness. If your thoughts overwhelm, making problems seem insurmountable, take care of your physical needs and your anxiety will decrease.

Stressed people don’t look after their basic needs, and rarely perform kind actions on their own behalf. If you stop carrying out the behaviors of an anxious person, you will no longer be one. A lack of healthy food, coupled with unhealthy behaviors, results in depletion of the body and soul. Change this, and you will change.

The next step is to look after your mind. If it’s like an overfilled pot on the boil, you have too many thoughts. You can think less by practicing meditation. However, if sitting and focusing on your breath as you let unwanted thoughts go feels impossible, be mindfully aware of your physical actions.

Focus on walking for five minutes – you can increase the time as the days pass – noticing your muscles working as you take a step forward, and how the soles of your feet feel as they touch the ground. When thoughts pop into your head, notice them, but move them back to physical actions. Mindful activity will empty some of the mental clutter in your head and release tension.

There may be more involved in coming off the boil completely, but take care of your body and mind, and you will see how to get out of a stuck way of thinking. Additionally, you will have vitality to see you through difficulties.

About bridget

bridget webber

Bridget Webber’s background rests in mental health, counselling, hypnotherapy, NLP and art. She brings knowledge from her experiences into her writing and specializes in emotional wellness and the creation of, rather than search for, joy. You can catch up with her insights and musings on Twitter.

Twitter: @InsightManager

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